苏州太仓治疗早孕哪家医院最好的

明星资讯腾讯娱乐2017年10月22日 03:31:11
0评论
kY@TPlhfe)mPs.^t1#oiH)5C0Lets tell them that the victory to be won in the twentieth century, this portal to the Golden Age, mocks the pretensions of individual acumen and ingenuity, for it is a citadel guarded by thick walls of ignorance and of mistrust which do not fall before the trumpets blast or the politicians imprecations or even a generals baton.They are -- They are, my friends, walls that must be directly stormed by the hosts of courage, of morality, and of vision, standing shoulder to shoulder, unafraid of ugly truth, contemptuous of lies, half truths, circuses, and demagoguery.The people are wise, wiser than the Republicans think. And the Democratic Party is the peoples Party -- not the labor Party, not the farmers Party, not the employers Party -- it is the Party of no one because it is the Party of everyone.fK6IhvhGkN.R0qD_SL-8]xt@e5IP+(AveBW]q.ahpX201202/170279"Relentless Efforts to Stop the Leak and Contain the Damage"This morning the President met with members of his Cabinet to get another comprehensive update on the ongoing Administration-wide response to the disastrous BP oil spill in the Gulf region. The President made clear his frustration with BP and the other parties involved in the spill, committed once again to ensuring they are held accountable for picking up the tab, and recapped the Administration’s efforts to tighten up the regulation of offshore drilling sites.Download Video: mp4 (206MB) | mp3 (7MB) 201005/103821

Watch a behind-the-scenes with President Obama and students from the film Waiting for Superman. Yesterday, the children, their families and others that worked on the movie met with President Obama in the Oval Office and watched him depart in helicopter Marine One from the South Lawn of the White House.Download Video: mp4 (12MB) 201010/115681

President Bush Attends Kuwait-America Foundation's Stand for Africa Gala Dinner   THE PRESIDENT: Thank you all. Mr. Ambassador, thank you for the invitation. You've got a beautiful place here. (Laughter.) Rima, thanks very much. I'm honored to be with you. I'm a little late because Laura had me watching "Father of the Bride." (Laughter.) And in that I didn't finish it, I'm going to make my remarks short and go home and watch it. (Laughter.) It's going to be a big year for us. So the guy comes to see me, and he says, I want to marry your daughter. I said, done deal. (Laughter.)   It's also a big year for us because I'm absolutely convinced the momentum that we have started on the continent of Africa in dealing with HIV/AIDS or malaria is going to continue on for a long period of time. And I want to thank you all very much for supporting the initiative.   I do want to say something about our Secretary of State. I can remember early on in my administration -- she was the National Security Advisor then -- and she said, I presume you're going to pay attention to Africa. And I said, that's a good presumption, because I believe to whom much is given, much is required. And the ed States of America has been given a lot. And I firmly believe we're required to respond to human tragedy when we see it.   And there's nothing more tragic than a young baby dying because of a mosquito bite. And so I come to you optimistic about this initiative, and thankful for the folks who are supporting Malaria No More. I, too, want to thank Ray Chambers for his leadership. I like it when people do well in the business world, and then rather than retire, decide to put something back into society. That's exactly what you've done, and we're very grateful for doing what you're doing. I see Justice Alito is here. That's good. Hey, Sam, good to see you. (Laughter.)   Youssou N'Dour. So, Youssou, I've been practicing my dancing recently -- (laughter) -- and singing. (Laughter.) And I'm available for a few tips. I appreciate the members of my Cabinet who are here, and members of Congress. (%bk%)  I, too, want to thank Admiral Mike Mullen for serving as the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs, and his wife, Deborah. It's amazing to be the Commander-in-Chief of a group of people that are dedicated, selfless and courageous like our military, and Admiral Mullen represents the very best of the U.S. military. I thank the Diplomatic Corps who is here, as well.   So, my friends in Texas say, you know, don't we have enough problems here at home? And my answer is, we're wealthy enough and we're strong enough and we're good enough to take problems -- take on problems here at home, as well as in other parts of the world. And then I remind them that we're living in a very difficult period in the history of the world. After all, we're witnessing an ideological struggle between those who kill the innocent to achieve political objectives and those who believe in human dignity and human rights and human freedom.   And it's a tough time, and it's going to take a while to prevail. But one thing is for certain: that this enemy we face cannot possibly find recruits based upon their vision. Their vision for life is so dark and so dim and so degrading that it's impossible for them to recruit unless they find hopeless situations. And there's nothing more hopeless for a mother to see a baby die needlessly. And there's nothing more hopeless than a pandemic that sweeps through a continent.   And so the initiative, the Malaria No More initiative, first and foremost is a part of our efforts to make sure that peace prevails in the long term. And it's working. It's amazing. Admiral Ziemer is here. This guy can get the job done. See, I -- one of the things that we pride ourselves on in this administration is we like to not only be talkers, we like to be doers. We like to set out an agenda and then see to it that the agenda is accomplished.   And working on this Malaria Initiative, we can measure. You can measure how many nets have been purchased and distributed; how many pills have been distributed; how many countries have been affected. When we were in Tanzania, we were told that Zanzibar, which is a part of Tanzania, went from having their babies infected by malaria at the tune of 20 percent to 1 percent in 18 months. And so I am the kind of fellow that says, this is in our interests and I expect the monies that we're spending to be spent well and to be spent wisely, and they are. (%bk%)  It's also in our moral interest. Our nation is a better nation when we help people save lives. The collective will of the American people to help somebody who suffers, who they might not ever know, lifts our national spirit. And so on our trip to Africa, I tried to make sure that the people of Africa understood this wasn't a George Bush initiative or a Laura Bush initiative or a Condi Rice initiative; this was an initiative of the most compassionate people on the face of the earth -- the American people.   And you're helping this initiative go forward. And so I've taken a breather from the movie to come by -- (laughter) -- to thank you very much for standing strong with the forces of goodness and light and compassion. And the work you're doing is necessary and it's important and it's succeeding. And I hope you take great heart in that.   Thanks for letting me come by to say, hi; and God bless you all. (Applause.) 200806/40957

  演讲文本Ronald Reagan's address on the space shuttle "Challenger" tragedy (28 January 1986) Ladies and Gentlemen, I'd planned to speak to you tonight to report on the state of the Union, but the events of earlier today have led me to change those plans. Today is a day for mourning and remembering. Nancy and I are pained to the core by the tragedy of the shuttle Challenger. We know we share this pain with all of the people of our country. This is truly a national loss.Nineteen years ago, almost to the day, we lost three astronauts in a terrible accident on the ground. But, we've never lost an astronaut in flight. We've never had a tragedy like this. And perhaps we've forgotten the courage it took for the crew of the shuttle. But they, the Challenger Seven, were aware of the dangers, but overcame them and did their jobs brilliantly. We mourn seven heroes: Michael Smith, Dick Scobee, Judith Resnik, Ronald McNair, Ellison Onizuka, Gregory Jarvis, and Christa McAuliffe. We mourn their loss as a nation together. For the families of the seven, we cannot bear, as you do, the full impact of this tragedy. But we feel the loss, and we're thinking about you so very much. Your loved ones were daring and brave, and they had that special grace, that special spirit that says, "Give me a challenge, and I'll meet it with joy." They had a hunger to explore the universe and discover its truths. They wished to serve, and they did. They served all of us. We've grown used to wonders in this century. It's hard to dazzle us. But for twenty-five years the ed States space program has been doing just that. We've grown used to the idea of space, and, perhaps we forget that we've only just begun. We're still pioneers. They, the members of the Challenger crew, were pioneers. And I want to say something to the schoolchildren of America who were watching the live coverage of the shuttle's take-off. I know it's hard to understand, but sometimes painful things like this happen. It's all part of the process of exploration and discovery. It's all part of taking a chance and expanding man's horizons. The future doesn't belong to the fainthearted; it belongs to the brave. The Challenger crew was pulling us into the future, and we'll continue to follow them. I've always had great faith in and respect for our space program. And what happened today does nothing to diminish it. We don't hide our space program. We don't keep secrets and cover things up. We do it all up front and in public. That's the way freedom is, and we wouldn't change it for a minute. We'll continue our quest in space. There will be more shuttle flights and more shuttle crews and, yes, more volunteers, more civilians, more teachers in space. Nothing ends here; our hopes and our journeys continue. I want to add that I wish I could talk to every man and woman who works for NASA, or who worked on this mission and tell them: "Your dedication and professionalism have moved and impressed us for decades. And we know of your anguish. We share it." There's a coincidence today. On this day 390 years ago, the great explorer Sir Francis Drake died aboard ship off the coast of Panama. In his lifetime the great frontiers were the oceans, and a historian later said, "He lived by the sea, died on it, and was buried in it." Well, today, we can say of the Challenger crew: Their dedication was, like Drake's, complete. The crew of the space shuttle Challenger honored us by the manner in which they lived their lives. We will never forget them, nor the last time we saw them, this morning, as they prepared for their journey and waved goodbye and "slipped the surly bonds of earth" to "touch the face of God."200603/5044

  Ladies and gentleman , good morning and welcome to the 21st Century Erisson Cup Sixth National English Speaking Competition .女士们,先生们,早上好,欢迎来到;21世纪爱立信杯;第六届全国英语演讲比赛现场.First of all, well in introduce ourselves,My names is Rick.首先,让我们介绍一下自己.我的名字叫里克.Wo Shi Like (Chinese )from China Radio International .Thank you .And let me introduce to you ,from BTV, the very lovely Jiang Hua.我是来自中国国际广播电台的里克(中文).谢谢!同时让我来给你们介绍来自北京电视台的非常可爱的姜华.Thank you Rick ,Im Jiang Hua from Beijing TV and Im the host of Hello World .谢谢里克.我是来自北京电视台的姜华,是;你好世界;的主持人.Umm, this is the sixth time that China Daily has organized this contest.This year to stir up enthusiasm and support for Beifings bid for 2008 Olympic Games and popularizing English among Chinese people ,the Competition comes back to Beijing.这已经是中国日报社第六次组织的全国英语演讲比赛.今年为了激发热情,持北京申办2008年的奥运会,为了在中国人当中普及英语,比赛场地又回到了北京.Thats right .This years competition is organized by the China Daily and Ericsson China Company Limited , Coordinted by the Enlish Speaking Union and China University English speaking Association ,and Co-sponsored by EF Education ,Beijing Television ,Times Publishing Group of Singapore ,Shanghai Foreign Laguage Education Press, and pierson Education .是的,今年的比赛由中国日报社和爱立信(中国)有限公司主办,国际英语联合会和中国高校英语口语协会协办,赞助单位有英孚教育集团,北京电视台,新加坡时代出版集团,上海外语教育出版社以及培生出版集团.And now lets go over the rules of the competition .现在让我们介绍一下比赛的有关规则.OK,each of the contestants has five minutes to present a prepared speech ,three minutes to present an unprepared speech and another three minutes to answer questions raised by the panel of judges.每位参赛选手完成五分钟的命题演讲,三分钟的即兴演讲和三分钟的答辩.Now , during the prepared speech a competition staff member will raise a red paper board at the four minutemark to let the speaker know he or she has one minute left.在命题演讲中,比赛工作人员会在四分钟的时候举起一张红纸板,告诉演讲者他或者她还剩下一分钟的演讲时间.And ,a bell will ring out at the end of five minutes.并且在五分钟的结尾会鸣钟示意.Ok, our topic today for prepared speech is ;Beijing 2008:The Meaning of the Bid;.今天我们命题演讲的主题是;北京2008:申奥意义之我见.;The top two contestants will be honored as the most promising speakers to be invited to participate in the internatinal Public Speaking Competition sponsored by the English Speaking Union in London.比赛的前两名获得者将荣获;最具潜力选手;的称号,并被邀请到由国际英语联合会发起,在伦敦举行的国际英语演讲比赛.Among the remaining contestants ,the top two will be awarded a two-week training course in an international language school in Britain sponsored by EF Education.余下的选手当中,前两名将由英孚教育集团赞助,被选送到英国国际知名语言学校进行为期两周的修学访问.The third and fourth place winners will be awarded a study trip to Singapore sponsored by The Times Publishing Group .余下的第三.四名将由时代出版集团赞助到新加坡进行修学访问.The next six among the rest will get the cash prize.The contestant who demonstrates the most creativity will receive a special prize sponsored by Ercsson Company .接下来的六名优胜者将会获得现金奖.最具创造力的选手获得由爱立信公司赞助的特别奖.And the top winner of all the contestants will take home the 21st Century Ericsson Cup.所有参赛选手中的第一名将成为;21世纪爱立信杯;的主人,You will see names of the past top winners have been engraved on the pedestal of the cup.你可以从奖杯的底座看到前几届比赛一等奖获得者的名字刻在上面.Whose name will be added this year, we will find out before sunset.Please welcome contestant number twenty-four.今年谁的名字将加到上面去呢,我们会在日落之前就有分晓.下面有请第二十四号参赛选手出场.06/74257。

  [Nextpage视频演讲]The President speaks about the importance of personal responsibility and giving back to the community as he delivers the commencement address at Kalamazoo Central High School in Kalamazoo, MI. The school was the winner of the 2010 Race to the Top High School Commencement ChallengeDownload Video: mp4 (254MB) | mp3 (25MB) [Nextpage演讲文本1]【Part 1】Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you, everybody. Please be seated. Hello, Giants. (Applause.) It is good -- it is good to be here, and congratulations Class of 2010. (Applause.) I am honored to be part of this special occasion.AUDIENCE MEMBER: We love you!THE PRESIDENT: And I love you back. (Applause.) Let me acknowledge your extraordinary governor, Jennifer Granholm. (Applause.) Superintendent Rice, thank you for your inspiring words. (Applause.) Your mayor, Bobby Hopewell, who I understand is a proud Kalamazoo graduate himself. (Applause.) Thanks to Principal Washington for -- (applause) -- not just for the warm introduction, but for his enthusiasm and his energy and his leadership and his nice singing voice. (Laughter.) Thank you. To all the trustees, to the alumni, to the parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins -- everybody who’s been a part of this extraordinary place. (Applause.) And I want to recognize our student speakers. Cindy, who embodies the best of our traditions in this country -- arrived three or four years ago and graduates as the valedictorian -- this is what is continually replenishing the energy and the dynamism and the innovation of this country, and we could not be prouder of you. Thank you. (Applause.) And to Simon, I’m glad that, according to the Constitution, you can’t run till you’re 35. (Laughter and applause.) So I’ll be long gone by then. (Laughter.) But it gives me great confidence to know that we’ve got such incredible young leaders who are going to be remaking the world in so many different ways.Now, recently, an article from your local paper, the Kalamazoo Gazette -- (applause) -- was brought to my attention. And it ran just after this school had been chosen as one of the six finalists in our Race to the Top Commencement Challenge. And for those who aren’t aware of it, this is a contest to highlight schools that promote academic excellence, personal responsibility and that best prepare students for college and careers. And this article in the Gazette ed a young lady named Kelsey Wilson -- (applause.) Where is -- is Kelsey here? She right over there? (Applause.) Anyway --AUDIENCE MEMBERS: She’s here.THE PRESIDENT: She’s over there? Hey, Kelsey. How are you? (Laughter.)[Nextpage演讲文本2]【Part 2】So Kelsey was ed as saying, “We’re the kind of school that never gets credit for what we do. And our school is amazing.” This is what Kelsey said, “Our school is amazing.”Well, Kelsey, Class of 2010, members of the Kalamazoo community, I’m here tonight because after three rounds of competition, with more than a thousand schools, and more than 170,000 votes cast, I know -- and America knows -- what you’ve done at Kalamazoo Central. You are amazing! (Applause.) We know. We know. (Applause.) Our amazing Secretary of Education Arne Duncan knows. (Applause.) Folks in Washington know, folks across the country know, and hopefully after tonight, everybody knows. Now, together as a community, you’ve embraced the motto of this school district: “Every child, every opportunity, every time.” (Applause.) Every time. Every child, every opportunity, every time, because you believe, like I do, that every young person, every child -- regardless of what they look like, where they come from, how much money their parents have -- every child who walks through your schoolhouse doors deserves a quality education. No exceptions. (Applause.)And I’m here tonight because I think that America has a lot to learn from Kalamazoo Central about what makes for a successful school in this new century. (Applause.) You’ve got educators raising standards and then inspiring their students to meet them. You’ve got community members who are stepping up as tutors and mentors and coaches. You got parents who are taking an active interest in their child’s education -- attending those teacher conferences, yes, turning off the TV once in a while, making sure homework gets done. Arne Duncan is here tonight because these are the values, these are the changes that he’s encouraging in every school in this nation. It’s the key to our future.But the most important ingredient is you: students who raised your sights, who aimed high, who invested yourselves in your own success. It’s no accident that so many of you have received college admissions letters, Class of 2010. That didn’t happen by accident. It happened because you worked for it. As the superintendent said, you earned it.So, Kelsey, I agree with you. What you’ve done here at Kalamazoo Central is amazing. (Applause.) I am proud of you. Your parents are proud of you. Your teachers, your principal -- we’re all incredibly proud.[Nextpage演讲文本3]【Part 3】Now, graduates, all these folks around you, I have to say, though, with the cameras and the beaming smiles -- they’ve worked hard to give you everything you need to pursue your dreams and fulfill your God-given talent. Unfortunately, you can’t take them with you when you leave here. (Laughter.) No one is going to go follow you around making sure that you’re getting to class on time, making sure you’re doing your work. Nobody is going to be doing that for you. Going forward, that’s all on you -- responsibility for your success is squarely on your shoulders. And the question I have for you today is this: What is each -- what are each of you going to do to meet that responsibility? Now, right now you’re getting plenty of advice from everybody. Some of it’s helpful. (Laughter.) And so I hate to pile on with advice. But while I’m here -- (laughter) -- what the heck. (Laughter.) I figure I should offer a few thoughts based on my own experiences, but also based on my hopes for all of you, and for our country, in the years ahead.First, understand that your success in life won’t be determined just by what’s given to you, or what happens to you, but by what you do with all that’s given to you; what you do with all that happens to you; how hard you try; how far you push yourself; how high you’re willing to reach. True excellence only comes with perseverance. This wasn’t something I really understood when I was back your age. My father, some of you know, left my family when I was two years old. I was raised by a single mom and my grandparents. (Applause.) And sometimes I had a tendency to goof off. As my mother put it, I had a tendency sometimes to act a bit casual about my future. (Laughter.) Sometimes I was rebellious. Sometimes I partied a little too much. (Applause.) Oh, yes, yes, this is a cautionary tale. (Laughter.) Don’t be cheering when I say that. (Laughter.) Studied just enough to get by. I thought hard work, responsibility, that’s old-fashioned. That’s just people want to tell me what to do. But after a few years, after I was living solely on my own and I realized that living solely for my own entertainment wasn’t so entertaining anymore, that it wasn’t particularly satisfying anymore, that I didn’t seem to be making much of a ripple in the world, I started to change my tune. I realized that by refusing to apply myself, there was nothing I could point to that I was proud of that would last. [Nextpage演讲文本4]【Part 4】Now, you come of an age in a popular culture that actually reinforces this approach to life. You watch TV, and basically what it says is you can be rich and successful without much effort; you just have to become a celebrity. (Laughter.) If you can achieve some reality TV notoriety, that’s better than lasting achievement. We live in a culture that tells you there’s a quick fix for every problem and a justification for every selfish desire. And all of you were raised with cell phones and iPods, and texting and emails, and you’re able to call up a fact, or a song, or a friend with the click of a button. So you’re used to instant gratification.But meaningful achievement, lasting success -- it doesn’t happen in an instant. It’s not about luck, it’s not about a sudden stroke of genius. It’s not usually about talent. It’s usually about daily effort, the large choices and the small choices that you make that add up over time. It’s about the skills you build, and the knowledge you accumulate, and the energy you invest in every task, no matter how trivial or menial it may seem at the time. You’ve got an alum who plays for the Yankees, I hear. He’s supposed to be pretty good. (Applause.) Now, Derek Jeter wasn’t born playing shortstop for the Yankees. He got there through years of effort. And his high school baseball coach once remarked, “I’m surprised he still doesn’t have blisters and that I don’t have the blisters on my hands from hitting ground balls just for Derek.” He always wanted more: ‘How about one more turn in the batting cage? Or 25 more ground balls?’”Thomas Edison tested more than 6,000 different materials for just one tiny part of the light bulb that he invented. Think about that -- 6,000 tests. J.K. Rowling’s first Harry Potter book was rejected 12 times before it was finally published. Mozart was a musical prodigy, but he practiced for hours each day -- accumulating thousands of hours at the piano by the time he was just six years old. I understand that your boys’ basketball team did pretty good. (Applause.) First state champions for the first time in 59 years. That didn’t happen by accident. They put in work. They put in effort.So, today, you all have a rare and valuable chance to pursue your own passions, chase your own dreams without incurring a mountain of debt. What an incredible gift. So you’ve got no excuse for giving anything less than your best effort. (Applause.) No excuses. [Nextpage演讲文本5]【Part 5】That’s my second piece of advice, very simple: Don’t make excuses. Take responsibility not just for your successes; take responsibility where you fall short as well. Now, the truth is, no matter how hard you work, you’re not going to ace every class -- well, maybe Cindy will, but -- (laughter.) But you’re not going to ace every class. You’re not going to succeed the first time you try something. There are going to be times when you screw up. There will be times where you hurt people you love. There will be times where you make a mistake and you stray from the values that you hold most deeply. And when that happens, it’s the easiest thing in the world to start looking around for somebody else to blame. Your professor was too hard; your boss was a jerk; the coaches -- was playing favorites; your friend just didn’t understand. Your wife -- oh, no. (Laughter.) I’m just messing with Michelle right there. (Laughter.) That was all in fun. (Laughter.) No, but this is an easy habit to get into. You see it every day in Washington -- every day -- folks calling each other names, making all sorts of accusations on television. Everybody is always pointing a finger at somebody else. You notice that? Now, this community could have easily gone down that road. This community could have made excuses -- well, our kids have fewer advantages, our schools have fewer resources -- how can we compete? You could have spent years pointing fingers -- blaming parents, blaming teachers, blaming the principal, blaming the superintendent, blaming the President. (Laughter and applause.) But that’s -- Class of 2010, I want you to pay attention on this because that’s not what happened. Instead, this community was honest with itself about where you were falling short. You resolved to do better, push your kids harder, open their minds wider, expose them to all kinds of ideas and people and experiences. So, graduates, I hope you’ll continue those efforts. Don’t make excuses. And I hope that wherever you go, you won’t narrow the broad intellectual and social exposure you’ve had here at Kalamazoo Central -- instead, seek to expand it. Don’t just hang out with people who look like you, or go to the same church you do, or share your political views. Broaden your circle to include people with different backgrounds and life experiences. Because that’s how you’ll end up learning what it’s like to walk in somebody else’s shoes. (Applause.) That’s how you’ll come to understand the challenges other people face. And this is not just an academic exercise. It’s a way to broaden your ambit of concern and learn to see yourselves in each other. Which brings me to my final piece of advice for today, and that’s to give back, to be part of something bigger than yourselves. Hitch your wagon to something that is bigger than yourselves.I know that so many of you have aly served your community through efforts like your Stuff the Bus food drives and groups like Activists for Action. And I commend you for that. (Applause.)[Nextpage演讲文本6]【Part 6】But I also know that many of you are the first in your family to go to college. And right about now, you may be feeling all the weight of their hopes and expectations coming down on your shoulders. And once you start juggling those classes and activities and that campus job, and you get caught up in your own dreams and your own anxieties and dating -- (laughter) -- you may feel like you’ve got enough on your plate just dealing with your own life. It might be easier to turn the channel when the news disturbs you, to avert your eyes when you pass that homeless man on the street, to tell yourself that other people’s problems really aren’t your responsibility.But just think about what the consequence of that approach to life would have been if that’s how folks had acted here in this community. What if those Kalamazoo Promise donors had said to themselves, “Well, you know what, I can pay for my own kid’s education. Why should I have to pay for somebody else’s?” Think about the consequences for our country. What if our Founding Fathers had said, “You know, colonialism is kind of oppressive, but I’m doing okay, my family’s doing all right, why should I spend my summer in Philadelphia arguing about a Constitution?” What if those abolitionists, those civil right workers had said, “You know, slavery is wrong, segregation is wrong, but it’s kind of dangerous to get mixed up in that stuff. I don’t have time for all those meetings and marches. I think I’m going to take a pass. I hope it works out, but that’s not something I want to do.” I want you to think for a minute about the extraordinary men and women who’ve worn our country’s uniform and have given their last full measure of devotion to keep us safe and free. (Applause.) What if they said -- what if they said, “I really do love this country, but why should I sacrifice so much for people I’ve never even met?” Young men and women in uniform right now making those sacrifices. (Applause.) So you and I are here today because those people made a different choice. They chose to step up. They chose to serve. And I hope you will follow their example, because there is work to be done, and your country needs you. We’ve got an economy to rebuild. We’ve got children to educate. We’ve got diseases to cure. We’ve got threats to face. We’ve got an oil spill to clean up. (Applause.) We’ve got clean energy to discover. And it is going to be up to you to meet all of those challenges -- to build industries and make discoveries and inspire the next generation. It’s going to be up to you to heal the divide that continues to afflict our world. Now, I’m not saying you got to do it here all at once. But as Theodore Roosevelt once put it, I’m asking you to “Do what you can, with what you’ve got, where you are.” And I can guarantee that wherever your journey takes you, there are going to be children who need mentors and senior citizens who need assistance, folks down on their luck who could use a helping hand. And once you’ve reached out and formed those connections, you’ll find it’s a little harder to numb yourself to other people’s suffering. It’s a little harder to ignore the national debates about the issues that affect their lives and yours.In the end, service binds us to each other -- and to our communities and our country -- in a way that nothing else can. It’s how we become more fully American. That’s the reason those donors created the Kalamazoo Promise in the first place -- not for recognition or reward, but because of their connection to this community; because their belief in your potential; because their faith that you would use this gift not just to enrich your own lives, but the lives of others and the life of the nation. (Applause.) And I’m told that soon after the Promise was established, a first grader approached the superintendent at the time and declared to her: “I’m going to college.” First grader. “I’m going to college. I don’t know what it is, but I’m going.” (Laughter and applause.) We may never know those donors’ names, but we know how they helped bring this community together and how you’ve embraced their Promise not just as a gift to be appreciated, but a responsibility to be fulfilled. We know how they have helped inspire an entire generation of young people here in Kalamazoo to imagine a different future for themselves. And graduates, today, I’m asking you to pay them back by seeking to have the same kind of impact with your own lives; by pursuing excellence in everything you do; by serving this country that you love. (Applause.)I know that you can do it. After all, you are the Giants -- (applause) -- and with the education you’ve gotten here, there’s nothing you can’t do. Thank you very much, everybody. God bless you. And God bless the ed States of America. (Applause.) And God bless the Class of 2010. (Applause.)END201006/105752

  A WORLD THAT STANDS AS ONE July 24, 2008 | Berlin, Germany Thank you to the citizens of Berlin and to the people of Germany. Let me thank Chancellor Merkel and Foreign Minister Steinmeier for welcoming me earlier today. Thank you, Mayor Wowereit , the Berlin Senate , the police, and most of all thank you for this welcome.I come to Berlin as so many of my countrymen have come before. Tonight, I speak to you not as a candidate for President, but as a citizen—a proud citizen of the ed States, and a fellow citizen of the world.I know that I don’t look like the Americans who’ve previously spoken in this great city. The journey that led me here is improbable . My mother was born in the heartland of America, but my father grew up herding goats in Kenya. His father—my grandfather—was a cook, a domestic servant to the British.At the height of the Cold War, my father decided, like so many others in the forgotten corners of the world, that his yearning —his dream—required the freedom and opportunity promised by the West. And so he wrote letter after letter to universities all across America until somebody, somewhere answered his prayer for a better life .That is why I’m here. And you are here because you, too, know that yearning. This city, of all cities, knows the dream of freedom. And you know that the only reason we stand here tonight is because men and women from both of our nations came together to work, and struggle, and sacrifice for that better life.Ours is a partnership that truly began sixty years ago this summer, on the day when the first American plane touched down at Tempelhof .On that day, much of this continent still lay in ruin. The rubble of this city had yet to be built into a wall . The Soviet shadow had swept across Eastern Europe, while in the West, America, Britain, and France took stock of their losses and pondered how the world might be remade.This is where the two sides met. And on the twenty fourth of June, 1948, the communists chose to blockade the western part of the city. They cut off food and supplies to more than two million Germans in an effort to extinguish the last flame of freedom in Berlin.The size of our forces was no match for the much larger Soviet army. And yet retreat would have allowed Communism to march across Europe. Where the last war had ended, another world war could have easily begun. All that stood in the way was Berlin. And that’s when the airlift began—when the largest and most unlikely rescue in history brought food and hope to the people of this city.The odds were stacked against success. In the winter, a heavy fog filled the sky above, and many planes were forced to turn back without dropping off the needed supplies. The streets where we stand were filled with hungry families who had no comfort from the cold. 08/81865Here's the from President Obama's appearance on the Late Show with David Letterman. Talk of foreign policy, economic recovery, and health insurance reform is punctuated by a special gift of produce. Check it out: 09/84877President Bush Meets with Prime Minister Singh of India at G8 Summit PRESIDENT BUSH: Prime Minister Singh and I just had a typical conversation among friends. We talked about common opportunities, world problems, and we did it in a spirit of respect -- and it was easy for me to do because I respect the Prime Minister a lot. I also respect India a lot, and I think it's very important that the ed States continues to work with our friends to develop not only a new strategic relationship, but a relationship that addresses some of the world's problems.We talked about the India-U.S. nuclear deal, and how important that is for our respective countries. We talked about the environment and how we can work together to grow our economies and, at the same time, be responsible stewards of the environment. We talked about free trade, the Doha Round, and how important it is that nations such as India and the ed States find common ground to make sure protectionist sentiments don't wall us off from the rest of the world.We talked about educational exchanges. I reminded the Prime Minister that the Indian American population is very proud of this relationship, and proud of their heritage, and proud of the leadership of the Prime Minister.All in all, it was a really good meeting amongst two friends. And so, Mr. Prime Minister, thank you for joining us today, and congratulations on your leadership at home.PRIME MINISTER SINGH: Mr. President, it is a great opportunity for me to once again meet you and to review with you the state of Indo-American relations. And I'm very happy to report to the President that our relations have moved forward handsomely since our first meeting in July 2005. We have made progress in all areas. We have progress in nuclear cooperation, space cooperation, defense cooperation, educational exchanges, our working together in multilateral institutions for the success of the Doha Round. And I am very pleased with the state of our relationship, which has truly acquired the characteristic of a genuine strategic partnership.I thank the President for his personal magnificent contribution to the evolution of our relationship. And all I can say is our relationship with the ed States has never been in such good shape as it is today. And it is the intention of my government, as I believe it is also the will of the Indian people, particularly the thinking segments of our population, that in this increasingly interdependent world that we live in, whether it is a question of climate change, whether it is a question of managing the global economy, India and ed States must stand tall, stand shoulder to shoulder, and that's what is going to happen.PRESIDENT BUSH: Thank you, sir.200807/43752

  12/90755President's Radio AddressTHE PRESIDENT: Good morning. This week, Congress voted to expand a vital program that is saving lives across the developing world -- the Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, also known as PEPFAR. I thank members of Congress from both sides of the aisle for working with my Administration to pass this important bill, and I will be honored to sign it into law next week.PEPFAR is the largest international health initiative dedicated to fighting a single disease in history. And it is a testament to the extraordinary compassion and generosity of the American people. When we first launched this program five-and-a-half years ago, the scourge of HIV/AIDS had cast a shadow over the continent of Africa. Only 50,000 people with AIDS in sub-Sahara Africa were receiving antiretroviral treatment. Today, PEPFAR is supporting treatment for nearly 1.7 million people in the region. PEPFAR has allowed nearly 200,000 African babies to be born HIV free. And this program is bringing hope to a continent in desperate need. The new legislation that I will sign next week will build on this progress. We will expand access to lifesaving antiretroviral drugs. We will help prevent millions of new HIV infections from occurring. And we will also bolster our efforts to help developing nations combat other devastating diseases like malaria and tuberculosis.Fighting disease is one part of America's larger commitment to help struggling nations build more hopeful futures of freedom. Over the past seven years, we've learned how advancing the cause of freedom requires combating hopelessness. This is because the only way that the enemies of freedom can attract new recruits to their dark ideology is to exploit distress and despair. So as we help struggling nations achieve freedom from disease through programs like PEPFAR, we must also help them achieve freedom from corruption, freedom from poverty, freedom from hunger, and freedom from tyranny. And that is exactly what we're doing.America is using our foreign assistance to promote democracy and good government. We have more than doubled the federal budget for democracy and governance and human rights programs. And through the Millennium Challenge Account, we have transformed the way we deliver aid, so we can support developing nations that make important political and economic reforms.America is promoting free trade and open investment. Over the long term, we know that trade and investment are the best ways to fight poverty, and build strong and prosperous societies. So we have expanded the African Growth and Opportunity Act to increase trade between America and Africa. We have put eleven new free trade agreements into effect since 2001. And we're striving to make this the year that the world completes an ambitious Doha Round agreement, so we can tear down barriers to trade and investment around the world. America is leading the fight against global hunger. This year, the ed States has provided more than .8 billion in new funds to bolster global food security. We are the world's largest provider of food aid, and we have proposed legislation that would transform the way we deliver this aid to promote greater self-reliance in developing nations.America is leading the cause of human rights. Over the past seven years, we've spoken out against human rights abuses by tyrannical regimes like those in Iran and Syria, Cuba, Sudan, and Zimbabwe. We've spoken candidly about human rights with nations with whom America has good relations, such as Egypt and Saudi Arabia and China. And to ensure that our Nation continues to speak out for those who have no other voice, I recently issued a directive instructing all senior U.S. officials serving in undemocratic countries to maintain regular contact with political dissidents and democracy activists.With all these steps, we're helping defeat the forces of violent extremism by offering a more hopeful vision of freedom. And as this vision takes hold in more nations around the world, America will be safer here at home.Thank you for listening.200807/45043

  Ladies and Gentlemen, Id planned to speak to you tonight to report on the state of the Union, but the events of earlier today have led me to change those plans. Today is a day for mourning and remembering. Nancy and I are pained to the core by the tragedy of the shuttle Challenger. We know we share this pain with all of the people of our country. This is truly a national loss.Nineteen years ago, almost to the day, we lost three astronauts in a terrible accident on the ground. But weve never lost an astronaut in flight. Weve never had a tragedy like this. And perhaps weve forgotten the courage it took for the crew of the shuttle. But they, the Challenger Seven, were aware of the dangers, but overcame them and did their jobs brilliantly. We mourn seven heroes: Michael Smith, Dick Scobee, Judith Resnik, Ronald McNair, Ellison Onizuka, Gregory Jarvis, and Christa McAuliffe. We mourn their loss as a nation together.For the families of the seven, we cannot bear, as you do, the full impact of this tragedy. But we feel the loss, and were thinking about you so very much. Your loved ones were daring and brave, and they had that special grace, that special spirit that says, ;Give me a challenge, and Ill meet it with joy.; They had a hunger to explore the universe and discover its truths. They wished to serve, and they did. They served all of us.Weve grown used to wonders in this century. Its hard to dazzle us. But for twenty-five years the ed States space program has been doing just that. Weve grown used to the idea of space, and, perhaps we forget that weve only just begun. Were still pioneers. They, the members of the Challenger crew, were pioneers.And I want to say something to the schoolchildren of America who were watching the live coverage of the shuttles take-off. I know its hard to understand, but sometimes painful things like this happen. Its all part of the process of exploration and discovery. Its all part of taking a chance and expanding mans horizons. The future doesnt belong to the fainthearted; it belongs to the brave. The Challenger crew was pulling us into the future, and well continue to follow them.Ive always had great faith in and respect for our space program. And what happened today does nothing to diminish it. We dont hide our space program. We dont keep secrets and cover things up. We do it all up front and in public. Thats the way freedom is, and we wouldnt change it for a minute.Well continue our quest in space. There will be more shuttle flights and more shuttle crews and, yes, more volunteers, more civilians, more teachers in space. Nothing ends here; our hopes and our journeys continue.I want to add that I wish I could talk to every man and woman who works for NASA, or who worked on this mission and tell them: ;Your dedication and professionalism have moved and impressed us for decades. And we know of your anguish. We share it.;Theres a coincidence today. On this day three hundred and ninety years ago, the great explorer Sir Francis Drake died aboard ship off the coast of Panama. In his lifetime the great frontiers were the oceans, and a historian later said, ;He lived by the sea, died on it, and was buried in it.; Well, today, we can say of the Challenger crew: Their dedication was, like Drakes, complete.The crew of the space shuttle Challenger honored us by the manner in which they lived their lives. We will never forget them, nor the last time we saw them, this morning, as they prepared for their journey and waved goodbye and ;slipped the surly bonds of earth; to ;touch the face of God.;Thank you. /201205/182066

  The President spoke about what the Labor movement has meant for America:It was working men and women who made the 20th century the American century. It was the labor movement that helped secure so much of what we take for granted today. (Applause.) The 40-hour work week, the minimum wage, family leave, health insurance, Social Security, Medicare, retirement plans. The cornerstones of the middle-class security all bear the union label.Read the Transcript | Download Video: mp4 (480MB) | mp3 (46MB) 201009/113395。

  mp4 下载 REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENTAFTER MEETING WITH ENERGY CEOSTHE PRESIDENT: Good afternoon, everybody. I just held a meeting with the CEOs of some of the most innovative energy companies in America to talk about growth and progress of a sector that represents a big piece of America's economic future. As our economy adapts to the challenges of a new century, new ways of producing and saving and distributing energy offer a unique opportunity to create millions of jobs for the American people.And obviously, this is a timely discussion, on a day of sobering news. The job figures released this morning show that we lost 467,000 jobs last month. And while the average loss of about 400,000 jobs per month this quarter is less devastating than the 700,000 per month that we lost in the previous quarter, and while there are continuing signs that the recession is slowing, obviously this is little comfort to all those Americans who've lost their jobs.We've taken some extraordinary measures to blunt the hard edges of the worst recession of our lifetime, and to offer assistance to those who've borne the brunt of this economic storm. But as I've said from the moment that I walked into the door of this White House, it took years for us to get into this mess, and it will take us more than a few months to turn it around.That's why the discussion that we had today is so important. It's men and women like these who will help lead us out of this recession and into a better future. My job -- and our job as a government -- is to do whatever we can to unleash the great, generative powers of the American economy by encouraging their efforts.And I'm absolutely confident that we can, at this period of difficulty, prove once again what this nation can achieve when challenged. And I'm confident that we're not only going to recover from this recession in the short term, but we're going to prosper in the long term. To do that, we have to act now to build a new foundation for lasting growth. And energy is one of the pillars of this new foundation, essential both to our recovery and our long-term prosperity.I'm pleased to say that we've achieved more in the past few months to create a new clean energy economy than we had achieved in many decades before. The recovery plan will double our country's supply of renewable energy, and is aly creating new clean energy jobs. Thanks to a remarkable partnership between automakers, autoworkers, environmental advocates, and states, we also set in motion a new national policy to increase gas mileage and decrease carbon pollution for all new cars and trucks sold in this country, which is going to save us 1.8 billion barrels of oil.And last Friday, the House of Representatives passed an extraordinary piece of legislation that would make renewable energy the profitable kind of energy in America. It will reduce our dependence on foreign oil. It will prevent the worst consequences of climate change. And above all, it holds the promise of millions of new jobs -- jobs, by the way, that can't be outsourced. The CEOs standing behind me know a lot about these kinds of companies. These are folks whose companies are helping to lead the transformation towards a clean energy future. Even as we face tough economic times, even as we continue to lose jobs, the CEOs here told me that they're looking to hire new people, in some cases to double or even triple in size over the next few years. They are making money and they are helping their customers save money on the energy front. So these companies are vivid examples of the kind of future we can create, but it's now up to the Senate to continue the work that was begun in the House to forge this more prosperous future. We're going to need to set aside the posturing and the politics -- and when we put aside the old ideological debates, then our choice is clear. It's a choice between slow decline and renewed prosperity. It's a choice between the past and the future. The American people I believe want us to make the right choice, and I'm confident that the Senate will. For at every juncture in our history, we've chosen to seize big opportunities -- rather than fear big challenges. We've chosen to take responsibility. We've chosen to honor the sacrifices of those who came before us -- and fulfill our obligations to generations to come. That's what we're going to do this time, as well.Thank you very much, everybody. 07/76470

  

  

  • 土豆滚动太仓港口开发区治疗宫颈肥大多少钱
  • 太仓妇科医院妇科咨询
  • 浮桥镇人民妇幼中心医院四维彩超预约百度热点
  • 虎扑医生太仓妇科病检查多少钱
  • 知乎求医太仓经济开发区治疗妇科炎症多少钱
  • 太仓外阴白斑治疗医院
  • 太仓娄东科教新城剖腹产多少钱央视首页
  • 太平洋求医太仓妇科医院流产
  • 城厢镇人流多少钱
  • 城厢镇治疗内分泌哪家医院最好的龙马生活
  • 太仓市医院做人流
  • 世纪问答苏州大学附属第二医院做孕检多少钱
  • 太仓港口开发区妇产科医院赶集在线太仓输卵管疏通要多少钱
  • 太仓友谊妇科医生
  • 太仓市各医院节育环价格
  • 嘉定区做无痛人流哪家医院最好的
  • 网易门户太仓哪检查妇科收费合理
  • 沙溪镇治疗宫颈炎哪家医院最好的
  • 太仓港口开发区看乳腺检查多少钱
  • 太仓什么地方做人流比较好
  • 嘉定人民妇幼中心医院在线咨询
  • 周新闻太仓第一人民医院有四维彩超吗
  • 挂号分享太仓市中医医院可以做引产吗飞度博文
  • 苏州市太仓人工流产哪家医院最好的慧聪百科太仓市医院有微创手术吗
  • 预约挂号联播太仓宫外孕手术大约多少钱康泰口碑
  • 太仓做阴蒂整形医院哪家好
  • 太仓打胎什么时候最好
  • 太仓清宫手术一般多少钱
  • 太仓的无痛人流多少钱
  • 太仓妇科医院最好的
  • 相关阅读
  • 太仓市第一人民医院可以做引产吗
  • 齐鲁论坛太仓最大的妇科医院
  • 嘉定区妇幼保健人民医院中药科
  • 知乎科普嘉定区中心医院引产多少钱
  • 城厢镇妇幼保健人民医院在线咨询华北开放
  • 太仓市第一人民医院人流价格表
  • 百姓认证太仓阴道镜需要多少钱
  • 城厢镇孕前检测哪家医院最好的
  • 上海嘉定看乳腺检查哪家医院最好的
  • 天涯门户太仓第二医院妇产科怎样医院医院
  • 责任编辑:今日医帮手

    相关搜索

      为您推荐