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2018年04月22日 16:34:16来源:康泰时讯

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  • 暂无音频Remarks By The President At Signing Of The American Ecovery And Reinvestment Act Denver Museum of Nature and ScienceDenver, ColoradoThe President: Thank you, everybody. Please have a seat. You guys can sit down, too. (Laughter.) Let me begin by saying thank you to a few people -- first of all, your outstanding Governor, Bill Ritter. Please give Bill a big round of applause. (Applause.) Lieutenant Governor Barbara O'Brien. (Applause.) Secretary of State Bernie Buescher. (Applause.) Your outstanding Mayor, John Hickenlooper. (Applause.) Your new Senator, Michael Bennett. (Applause.) Your old senator, now my Secretary of the Interior, Ken Salazar. (Applause.) Mark Udall is not here, but give him a round of applause anyway. (Applause.) One of the outstanding leaders who helped shepherd this process through in record time -- please give Max Baucus of Montana a big round of applause. Thank you, Max. (Applause.) To Secretary Federico Pena, one of my national co-chairs -- I would not be here if it were not for Federico. Thank you. (Applause.) To Representative Diana DeGette, who is a -- we are in her district. So, thank you so much. (Applause.) Representative Betsy Markey. (Applause.) Representative Jared Polis. (Applause.) Representative Ed Perlmutter. (Applause.) To all the other elected officials and outstanding leaders who are here. And to the whole Namaste family and Mr. Jones for outstanding work, congratulations. Give them a big round of applause. (Applause.) And to the best Vice President that we've had in a long time -- Joe Biden. (Applause.)It is great to be back in Denver. (Applause.) I was here last summer -- we had a good time -- (laughter) -- to accept the nomination of my party and to make a promise to people of all parties that I would do all that I could to give every American the chance to make of their lives what they will; to see their children climb higher than they did. And I'm back today to say that we have begun the difficult work of keeping that promise. We have begun the essential work of keeping the American Dream alive in our time. And that's why we're here today. (Applause.)Now, I don't want to pretend that today marks the end of our economic problems. Nor does it constitute all of what we're going to have to do to turn our economy around. But today does mark the beginning of the end -- the beginning of what we need to do to create jobs for Americans scrambling in the wake of layoffs; the beginning of what we need to do to provide relief for families worried they won't be able to pay next month's bills; the beginning of the first steps to set our economy on a firmer foundation, paving the way to long-term growth and prosperity.The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act that I will sign today -- a plan that meets the principles I laid out in January -- is the most sweeping economic recovery package in our history. It's the product of broad consultation and the recipient of broad support -- from business leaders, unions, public interest groups, from the Chamber of Commerce and the National Association of Manufacturers, as well as the AFL-CIO. (Applause.) From Democrats and Republicans, mayors as well as governors. It's a rare thing in Washington for people with such diverse and different viewpoints to come together and support the same bill. And on behalf of our nation, I want to thank all of them for it, including your two outstanding Senators, Michael Bennett and Mark Udall, as well as all the members of your congressional delegation. They did an outstanding job and they deserve a big round of applause. (Applause.) I also want to thank Joe Biden for working behind the scenes from the very start to make this recovery act possible. I want to thank Speaker Pelosi and Harry Reid for acting so quickly and for proving that Congress could step up to this challenge. I have special thanks to Max Baucus, who's the Chairman of the Finance Committee. Without Max, none of this would have happened. He had to work overtime, and push his committee to work overtime. And I want to thank all the committee chairs and members of Congress for coming up with a plan that is both bold and balanced enough to meet the demands of this moment. The American people were looking to them for leadership, and that's what they provided.Now, what makes this recovery plan so important is not just that it will create or save 3.5 million jobs over the next two years, including 60,000-plus here in Colorado. It's that we're putting Americans to work doing the work that America needs done –- (applause) -- in critical areas that have been neglected for too long; work that will bring real and lasting change for generations to come.Because we know we can't build our economic future on the transportation and information networks of the past, we are remaking the American landscape with the largest new investment in our nation's infrastructure since Eisenhower built an Interstate Highway System in the 1950s. (Applause.) Because of this investment, nearly 400,000 men and women will go to work rebuilding our crumbling roads and bridges, repairing our faulty dams and levees, bringing critical broadband connections to businesses and homes in nearly every community in America, upgrading mass transit, building high-speed rail lines that will improve travel and commerce throughout our nation.Because we know America can't out-compete the world tomorrow if our children are being out-educated today, we're making the largest investment in education in our nation's history. (Applause.) It's an investment that will create jobs building 21st century classrooms and libraries and labs for millions of children across America. It will provide funds to train a new generation of math and science teachers, while giving aid to states and school districts to stop teachers from being laid off and education programs from being cut. 02/62588。
  • President Bush Visits National Defense University's Distinguished Lecture Program, Discusses Global War on TerrorTHE PRESIDENT: Thank you, General, for your kind and short introduction. (Laughter.) I am pleased to be back at the National Defense University again. It turns out this is my fifth visit as President. Every time I come here I'm inspired and encouraged because of the brave men and women who work here. And I really do want to thank you for your warm hospitality.Across the world, NDU students and faculty have served with valor in the war against these extremists and killers. On this campus you're helping train the next generation of military and civilian leaders who will defend our nation against the real and true threats of the 21st century. You've developed new ways for our military and civilian personnel to work together to meet the new challenges we face. I thank you for your patriotism; I thank you for your hard work; and I thank you for your devotion to protecting the American people. (Applause.)I thank the members of the Congress who have joined us -- Congressman Randy Forbes of Virginia, and Congressman Trent Franks of Arizona. Thanks for coming. (Applause.)I'm going to be talking in a little while about a recommendation I have received from the Joint Chiefs, and I'm so pleased that the Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs General Cartwright is with us today. Thanks for coming, Hoss. (Applause.)I thank the leadership of the NDU. Thanks for having me again. I appreciate the civilian personnel, U.S. government civilians studying here. And I thank those who wear the uniform. You know, one of the great things about being the Commander-in-Chief is to be the Commander-in-Chief of people who have volunteered to serve our country in a time of danger. I'm incredibly impressed by our military, and I am thankful to our military families.You know, last week, a remarkable event took place in Iraq. At a ceremony in the city of Ramadi, responsibility for security in Anbar Province was transferred to Iraqi civilian authorities. Iraqi forces are now leading security operations across Anbar, with American troops in an "overwatch" role. With this transfer of responsibility, the people of Anbar took charge of their own security and their own destiny. It's a moment of pride for all Iraqis -- and it was a moment of success in the war on terror.Two years ago, such a moment was unimaginable to most. Anbar was one of the most dangerous provinces in Iraq. Al Qaeda was in control of almost every major population center. They had largely succeeded in turning the region into a safe haven, which brought them closer to one of their goals -- a place from which to launch new attacks against America, our allies, and our interests in the region. In 2006, a military intelligence report concluded that the province was lost -- and Anbar was held up as proof of America's failure in Iraq.Yet something remarkable was happening. The tribes in Anbar were growing tired of al Qaeda's brutality. They wanted to live a normal life. And this presented us with an opportunity to defeat al Qaeda in Anbar. Last year we sent 4,000 additional Marines to Anbar as part of the surge. The surge showed America's commitment to security. It showed we were committed to helping the average citizen in Anbar live a normal life. And it helped renew the confidence of local leaders, the tribal sheiks, who then led an uprising to take Anbar back from the terrorists. And together, local tribes, Iraqi troops, and American forces systematically dismantled al Qaeda control across the province.Today, Anbar is a province transformed. Attacks in the province have dropped by more than 90 percent. Casualties are down dramatically. Virtually every city and town in Anbar now has a mayor and a functioning municipal council. Provincial Reconstruction Teams are helping local leaders create jobs and economic opportunity. As security has improved, reconciliation is taking place across the province. Today, Anbar is no longer lost to al Qaeda -- it has been reclaimed by the Iraqi people.We're seeing similar gains in other parts of Iraq. Earlier this year, the Iraqi government launched a successful military operation against Shia extremist groups in places like Basra, and Baghdad, and al-Amarah. Iraqi forces are staying on the offense. They are pressing the advantage against those who would bring harm and danger to their citizens. They're conducting operations in and around the northern city of Mosul, where al Qaeda terrorists seek refuge. The Iraqi Army recently launched a new offensive against al Qaeda in Diyala Province. All these operations are Iraqi-led, with American forces playing a supporting role.As a result of these and other operations in Iraq, violence is down to its lowest point since the spring of 2004. Civilian deaths are down, sectarian killings are down, suicide bombings are down, and normal life is returning to communities across the country. Provincial reconciliation is moving forward. The Iraqi government has passed budgets and major pieces of legislation. Our diplomatic -- diplomats report that markets once shuttered by terrorist violence are now open for business. Yesterday, Ambassador Crocker and General Petraeus reported to me via STVS that they had just gone into a market area, and seen the commerce and the activities. The Iraqi Health Ministry issued an interesting report that said that hundreds of doctors who had fled the fighting have now returned to serve the people of their country.The reduced levels of violence in Iraq have been sustained for several months. While the progress in Iraq is still fragile and reversible, General Petraeus and Ambassador Crocker report that there now appears to be a "degree of durability" to the gains we have made.Here's the bottom line: While the enemy in Iraq dangerous, we have seized the offensive. Iraqi forces are becoming increasingly capable of leading and winning the fight. As a result, we've been able to carry out a policy of "return on success" -- reducing American combat forces in Iraq as conditions on the ground continue to improve.We've now brought home all five of the Army combat brigades, the Marine Expeditionary , two Marine battalions, that were sent to Iraq as part of the surge. I was proud to visit with some of those troops at Fort Bragg earlier this year. They are among our nation's finest citizens, and they have earned the gratitude and respect of the American people. (Applause.)Another aspect of our "return on success" policy in Iraq is reduced combat tours. Last month, troops began deploying for 12-month tours instead of 15-month tours. This change will ease the burden on our forces, and I think more importantly, this change will make life for our military families easier. (Applause.)I'm pleased to announce the next step forward in our policy of "return on success." General Petraeus has just completed a review of the situation in Iraq -- and he and the Joint Chiefs of Staff have recommended that we move forward with additional force reductions, and I agree. Over the next several months, we'll bring home about 3,400 combat support forces -- including aviation personnel, explosive ordnance teams, combat and construction engineers, military police, and logistical support forces.By November, we'll bring home a Marine battalion that is now serving in Anbar Province. And in February of , another Army combat brigade will come home. This amounts to about 8,000 additional American troops returning home without replacement. And if progress in Iraq continues to hold, General Petraeus and our military leaders believe additional reductions will be possible in the first half of .The progress in Iraq is a credit to the valor of American troops and civilians, the valor of Iraqi troops, and the valor of our coalition partners. And I thank those who are here from other nations for joining us, and I thank you for working with our troops. (Applause.) We welcome you to the ed States. And we appreciate you working closely with those who wear the uniform.Since Operation Iraqi Freedom began -- I want our fellow citizens to hear this fact -- more than 140,000 troops from 41 countries have served as part of our coalition in Iraq. Sons and daughters of Australia, Azerbaijan, the ed Kingdom, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, El Salvador, Estonia, Georgia, Hungary, Italy, Kazakhstan, Latvia, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, South Korea, Spain, Thailand, and Ukraine have given their lives in the fight against the extremists. (Applause.) The citizens of these countries have sacrificed for the cause of freedom in Iraq. America has been proud to serve alongside such courageous allies.I congratulate our coalition partners on their historic accomplishments in Iraq, and for maintaining their resolve during the dark days. Thanks to their determined work and the growing capability of Iraqi forces, many of our partners in Iraq are now in a position to "return on success" as well. Australia has withdrawn its battle group, the Polish contingent is set to redeploy shortly, and many more coalition nations will be able to conclude their deployments to Iraq this year -- thanks to the skill of their troops and the success of their missions. (Applause.)200809/48076。
  • THE PRESIDENT: Good morning. This week, millions of Americans gather with loved ones for Christmas. This is a season of hope and joy. And it is an occasion to remember a humble birth that has helped shape the world for more than two thousand years. One of the things that makes Christmas special is that it allows us to step back and take stock of what is truly meaningful in our lives. As years pass by, we often forget about the gifts and the parties, but we remember special moments with families and friends. This year, as you spend time with those you love, I hope you'll also take time to remember the men and women of our armed forces. Every one of them has volunteered to serve our Nation. And with their incredible sacrifices, they preserve the peace and freedom that we celebrate during this season. This tradition of service is as old as our Nation itself. In 1776, it looked as if America's first Christmas as an independent Nation might also be its last. After a series of crippling defeats by the British, George Washington's army was exhausted and disheartened. With their terms of service expiring in just a few weeks, many soldiers were planning on leaving the army. And it seemed that without a miracle, America's fight for freedom would be doomed. That miracle took place on Christmas night, 1776. George Washington planned a surprise attack on the enemy forces camped across the Delaware River in Trenton, New Jersey. Under the cover of darkness, he led a few thousand soldiers across the icy waters in the midst of a driving snowstorm. Most generals would not have taken such a risk. But the commitment of Washington and his men was absolute. They headed into battle with a bold password -- "Victory or death." In a matter of hours, victory was theirs. Morale immediately improved. And the American people began to believe that our Nation possessed the perseverance and courage to protect our liberty. The turnaround that began that night would end with the ed States' triumph in the American Revolution -- and the permanent establishment of a free Nation. Two hundred and thirty-two years have passed since George Washington crossed the Delaware. But on this Christmas, his legacy lives on in the men and women of the ed States military. Some of them are spending this holiday helping defend emerging democracies like Iraq and Afghanistan. Others are spending it in lands where we defeated tyranny long ago, such as Germany or Japan. And some of them are spending it stateside, recovering in places like Bethesda National Naval Medical Center or Walter Reed. Regardless of where they are, our men and women in uniform and the families who support them remind us of a clear lesson: Defending freedom is a full-time job. Our enemies do not take holidays. So the members of our armed forces stand y to protect our freedom at any hour. For their service, they have the thanks of a grateful Nation -- this Christmas and always. Thank you for listening. 200812/59523。
  • Hello, everybody.In the State of the Union, I laid out three areas we need to focus on if wersquo;re going to build an economy that lasts: new American manufacturing, new skills and education for American workers, and new sources of American-made energy.These days, wersquo;re getting another painful reminder why developing new energy is so important to our future. Just like they did last year, gas prices are starting to climb. Only this time, itrsquo;s happening earlier. And that hurts everyone ndash; everyone who owns a car; everyone who owns a business. It means you have to stretch your paycheck even further. Some folks have no choice but to drive a long way to work, and high gas prices are like a tax straight out of their paychecks.Now, some politicians always see this as a political opportunity. And since itrsquo;s an election year, theyrsquo;re aly dusting off their three-point plans for gas. Irsquo;ll save you the suspense: Step one is drill, step two is drill, and step three is keep drilling. We hear the same thing every year.Well the American people arenrsquo;t stupid. You know thatrsquo;s not a plan ndash; especially since wersquo;re aly drilling. Itrsquo;s a bumper sticker. Itrsquo;s not a strategy to solve our energy challenge. Itrsquo;s a strategy to get politicians through an election.You know there are no quick fixes to this problem, and you know we canrsquo;t just drill our way to lower gas prices. If wersquo;re going to take control of our energy future and avoid these gas price spikes down the line, then we need a sustained, all-of-the-above strategy that develops every available source of American energy ndash; oil, gas, wind, solar, nuclear, biofuels, and more. We need to keep developing the technology that allows us to use less oil in our cars and trucks; in our buildings and plants. Thatrsquo;s the strategy wersquo;re pursuing, and thatrsquo;s the only real solution to this challenge.Now, we absolutely need safe, responsible oil production here in America. Thatrsquo;s why under my Administration, America is producing more oil today than at any time in the last eight years. In 2010, our dependence on foreign oil was under 50% for the first time in more than a decade. And while there are no short-term silver bullets when it comes to gas prices, Irsquo;ve directed my administration to look for every single area where we can make an impact and help consumers in the months ahead, from permitting to delivery bottlenecks to whatrsquo;s going on in the oil markets.But over the long term, an all-of-the-above energy strategy means we have to do more. It means we have to make some choices.Herersquo;s one example. Right now, four billion of your tax dollars subsidize the oil industry every year. Four billion dollars.Imagine that. Maybe some of you are listening to this in your car right now, pulling into a gas station to fill up. As you watch those numbers rise, know that oil company profits have never been higher. Yet somehow, Congress is still giving those same companies another four billion dollars of your money. Thatrsquo;s outrageous. Itrsquo;s inexcusable. And it has to stop.A century of subsidies to the oil companies is long enough. Itrsquo;s time to end taxpayer giveaways to an industry thatrsquo;s never been more profitable, and use that money to reduce our deficit and double-down on a clean energy industry thatrsquo;s never been more promising. Because of the investments wersquo;ve aly made, the use of wind and solar energy in this country has nearly doubled ndash; and thousands of Americans have jobs because of it. And because we put in place the toughest fuel economy standards in history, our cars will average nearly 55 miles per gallon by the middle of the next decade ndash; something that, over time, will save the typical family more than ,000 at the pump. Now Congress needs to keep that momentum going by renewing the clean energy tax credits that will lead to more jobs and less dependence on foreign oil.Look, we know therersquo;s no silver bullet that will bring down gas prices or reduce our dependence on foreign oil overnight. But what we can do is get our priorities straight, and make a sustained, serious effort to tackle this problem. Thatrsquo;s the commitment we need right now. And with your help, itrsquo;s a commitment we can make. Thanks.201202/172729。
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